My mentoring success story

Jordan and I during an outing to Greenfield Village

Meeting your mentee and her family for the first time can be an intimidating experience.  You conjure up all kinds of scenarios in your head – a disgruntled kid, who is resistant or a suspicious parent, who questions your every move. These circumstances may play out like a drama in your mind’s eye. Thankfully, none of those happened for me. In fact, my experience was the opposite.

It’s been four years since I was introduced to my mentee Jordan. To this day, we’re still learning from each other. She’s an inquisitive, mature and friendly 12 year old. Being a mentor is one of the most rewarding experiences I’ve had since graduating college. Interestingly enough, I became a mentor for Alternatives for Girls during my senior year at Wayne State University.

Jordan’s mom Carmelita had this to say about our mentor/mentee relationship:

Jordan and I four years ago at our first group outing

“Having a mentor has introduced Jordan to different activities and experiences. She’s grown so much because of it. You all have done things together that I haven’t had the opportunity to do because of my unpredictable work schedule,” she says. “She looks at you like a big sister. She’s always excited and looks forward to the next meeting.”

Still not sure about mentoring?

Here are a few insights that may help you:

– You don’t have to be rich or famous or have super powers. Honestly, you don’t even have to be employed to be a good mentor. Kids just want to know you care.

– Most youth seeking mentors are good kids. While some youth may come from troubled backgrounds, many of them come from stable home environments. They may have challenges in school or socially. All children are different. Get to know them.

– If you have a big heart and a little time, then you’re a great candidate. Sometimes, a phone call is all it takes to make a difference.

When you feel inspired to pay it forward, consider donating your time to a young person. Visit for additional resources.


Girls learn art of self-expression during Community Chica Chat

When asked what’s the most important lesson learned during the Thursday, June 13th Community Chica Chat, one confident 13 year old said “don’t be afraid to express yourself.”

That was one of the goals of the two-hour workshop facilitated by Empowered Flower Girl CEO and Founder Rasheda Kamaria.

“Chica Chat is all about promoting sisterhood while empowering girls’ self expression, uniqueness and personal power,” said Kamaria, who founded the social enterprise in 2010. “The cyberbullying, drama and cliques are just the side effect of a bigger issue – the lack of communication skills and tools.”

Nearly 25 girls participated in the workshop held in partnership with Detroit Parent Network. Earlier this year, Kamaria received a $2,100 grant to support Empowered Flower Girl and its workshops/programs.

In addition to the Community Chica Chat, Empowered Flower Girl has hosted two workshops at Capstone Academy, a program for adjudicated adolescent girls ages 12-19.

On Aug. 17, Kamaria will facilitate a mini Chica Chat as part of the “I Feel Good: Mind, Body & Soul” women’s conference.

For more information about the event visit

Learn more about Empowered Flower Girl’s workshops and programs at

Images courtesy of Bontisha Rose Photography